St Peters Bristol

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School Values

At St. Peter’s we explore the following 6 key values across the academic year, with a focus on a different one each term. Please click on the value to understand more of how we incorporate these into our school life:

Friendship

Thankfulness

Resilience

Service

Forgiveness

Bravery (and confidence)

 

Friendship 

We generally explore friendship and kindness in Term 1 when the children are settling onto their new classes / a new school. 

Friendship is an undisputed value in our society, with children often spending more time with their friends than with family. It is a key concept in the Christian framework, with Jesus being criticised for being ‘the friend of sinners’ and eating with those whom society rejected. Sharing a meal with someone is an explicit sign of friendship and the word ‘companion’ literally means ‘one with whom you share bread.’ Our children enjoy sharing meals together sitting with friends at lunchtime and having picnics in the secret garden. 

The values awards are given to those who have shown that they can be a good friend. Stories such as Ruth and Naomi and the friends who help a disabled friend visit Jesus are shared with the children. 

What our children say:

Some of us have been at this school for a very long time. Friendships have to be worked on and tricky things make friendships stronger. Chloe, Age 10 

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Thankfulness  

Thankfulness has always been at the centre of the life and worship of God’s people. We generally explore thankfulness in Term 2 as the luxuries of Christmas are with us and all the gifts we generally receive start to be shared.

Under the Law of Moses, there were not only sacrifices for forgiveness, there were ‘thanks offerings’ as well. ‘Songs of thankfulness and praise...’ are at the heart of Christian worship. Thankfulness is directed towards God who gives and sustains life. Seeing the world as God’s creation underpins the way we approach everything in life, seeing it as a gift and not as a right. We sing everyday with the children and say Grace on a daily basis. 

What our children say:

I get toys for Christmas. Not all children get Christmas Presents. Some children in other places don’t get so much. Tommy, Age 5

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Resilience 

At its root, endurance is recognition that life is sometimes difficult and painful, and that it is important not to give up in the face of adversity. We learn phrases such as ‘If at first you don’t succeed…’ and we explore the lives of people who have struggled on even during times of adversity. 

We also note the constant assurance in the Bible that God’s love, mercy, faithfulness and righteousness endure forever (e.g. Psalm 118, 136). During this time we spend time looking at the Lord’s Prayer. 

Emphasis upon endurance is common in the New Testament where it is linked with patience and suffering. St Paul is certain that endurance is honed by suffering, is character building and is characterised by love (Romans 5:3-4; I Corinthians 4:12 – 13). It is linked with self-control, godliness (2 Peter 1:6) and steadfastness. We look at the life of St.Paul and other leaders who have stood by their faiths.

What our children say:

We all say ‘keep trying’ and ‘keep going’. Mary Jones walked 25 miles for a bible. I like to think what I would walk 25 miles for. Jordan, Age 9

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Service 

At St.Peter’s we spend a lot of time thinking about helping others and we try to put some of our thoughts into action. We call this giving ‘Service’ 

Jesus said that he ‘came not to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many. ’He washed the feet of his disciples at the Last Supper. This turned upside down the normal relationship between master and disciple, leader and follower. Jesus is very clear about the meaning of his action: ‘Now that I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also should wash one another’s feet. I have set you an example that you should do as I have done.’ 

In this term we read the parable of the Good Samaritan which shows we should serve those in need whoever they are. We also try to understand that such service is not offered to gain some advantage for ourselves. ‘Going the extra mile’ involves sacrifice, putting ourselves out for someone else’s benefit.

What our children say:

We have a sunshine club. At sunshine club we think of ways to help others then we try some of our ideas. Keeley, Age 10 

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Forgiveness 

During this term we also explore being at peace with yourself and others. We learn the song ‘Shalom’ and add new thoughts and ideas to our special areas. Shalom includes ideas of healing and health, wholeness and well-being. It means harmony, stability and security within a community. It refers to relationships based on truth and righteousness, where people flourish because they are nurtured. As part of this we focus on the concept of forgiveness and how having peace includes being able to forgive and be forgiven.  

Reflection is a hugely important part of our school. We regularly take time to reflect on how lucky we are, what is happening around us and want we went for ourselves and others now and in the future. 

All classrooms have special reflection areas and we have forget-me-not garden within the secret garden. We also look at how reflection helps us change parts of ourselves that are not as good or kind as they could be. The story of Zaccheus and the Lost Sheep help us with this.

What our children say:

When my Grandad died I was really upset. It’s nice to have somewhere to sit. He liked animals so I think of animals. James, Age 7 

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Bravery (and Confidence) 

Bravery  

We are always encouraging our children (and staff) to try new things. These include exploring new ideas, trying a new activity and preparing to move from class to another. Stories such as Daniel In The Lion’s Den and David and Goliath help us explore this concept. 

Confidence 

We use this value to help children understand how it is important to celebrate their successes and what they have achieved with their resilience. During this time we also talk about how being confident in your own beliefs allows you to serve others.  

But a Samaritan, as he travelled, came where the man was; and when he saw him, he took pity on him. He went to him and bandaged his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he put the man on his own donkey, took him to an inn and took care of him. Luke 10:33-34 

What our children say:

Once someone told me I shouldn’t believe in something. I think people should be allowed to believe what they like. Laura, Age 10 

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